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and technology? >> it's a good question, and it's one that comes up all the time. and i think the important thing to recognize is, you know, people -- when the airplane came along, okay, the framers had no idea there would be air travel like that. probably except for jefferson. [laughter] but he wasn't around when they were writing the constitution. so does that mean that the commerce clause doesn't apply to air travel? of course not. the principles that the framers meant to establish in the commerce clause certainly can readily be applied to evolving commerce. the court doesn't always get this right. i mean, for example, when wiretaps first came up, you know, when the framers wrote the fourth amendment about searches and seizures, they didn't envisions wiretaps, and the first decision was, well, the fourth amendment momentum apply o this. but it became pretty clear pretty quickly that allowing people to intercept private conversations constituted the same sort of search and seizure of material that the framers want to protect. so you try to find, at least i do -- different judges approach these
on the family property to turn it into a center for radio technology, a meteorology and gave it to the united states government during world war ii. he had one of the greatest collections of coins and stamps. he made a mark. >> one of the things that strikes me about the gilded age, there were wealthy people who believed to give back to society like andrew carnegie. did she donates her money to public service? >> she never did it publicly. of she would not let any suggestion that she had better sun and others have said there were plenty of places and people she gave to. she felt she was hounded constantly getting letters. she tried to keep it as quiet as possible. there is no proof. because other people said it at the time, one very close friend of hers who was a greek catholic philanthropist, and she became, i think she got hetty to give some money to the church. >> how hard was this to research? >> it was difficult. no diaries, know journals, she wanted no trace of her signature. she was afraid, she was accused in the lawsuit with her aunt's estate of forging her aunt's signatures she was a
, advances in technology, a whole host of technologies, gave government officials the power to invade individual privacy in a whole host of new ways. new ways, mr. president, that the founding fathers never dreamed of, and all through those days the congress and the courts struggled to keep up. time and time again, congress and the courts were most successful when they returned to the fundamental principles of the fourth amendment. and it's striking, mr. president, if you look at a lot of the debates that we're having today about the internet and the presiding officer has had a great interest in this, we've talked often about it, certainly the founding fathers could never have envisioned tweeting and twitter and the internet and all of these extraordinary, you know, technologies, but what we have seen as technology has continued to bring us this treasure trove of information, all of these spectacular opportunities, the founding fathers never envisioned, we saw that time and time again, that congress and the courts were most successful when they returned to the fundamental principles o
will continue. investment in science, technology and higher education, encouraging more young people to study science, technology, engineering and math, make sure that we are bringing young minds with the creativity and engineering backgrounds to create the economy is for the future is so important. that has been the lifeblood of the economy and it must continue. saving the manned space exploration program and insuring the long term future of nasa, and essentials generator for our economy, insuring that stay at home moms and dads to work so hard raising children and contributing to the community to save for retirement. and easing the marriage tax penalty by doubling the standard ridge is a few of the things that i hope will continue to be championed as i leave. it has been such an honor to serve in the united states senate and i leave with the hope that the values that built america into
that owned millvinia but there would be no way to know for sure. 20 first century technology is what helped unravel -- ten years ago i wouldn't have been able to write this book in the way that it is now. >> any more questions? we have a little time left. i just wanted to say something about the book that made me think, but here in texas, looking at its history, particularly the history of slavery and how texas developed, i didn't know but someone shared with me that there was an incentive to have slaves here in texas among regular people because as the land was given away the mexican government giving of land away was based on how many people were in your group. if you could bring slaves, then you would get more land, regular people brought slaves, especially in texas, lots of working-class people came with slaves in order to enhance, are an interesting test about texas itself. regular people and slavery. we have a little more time. if anyone would like to ask a question. okay. would you please move to the mike. >> when i looked at the first lady's great granddad in the new york times and
nerd. he liked the technological toys of the west. he was in touch with the syrian population. he certainly was not a lackey of the united states, and israel. in fact he was supported of hezbollah, amass, iran, and other groups and states, that had a lot of street credibility in the arab world. so they thought it would pass them over. in fact i know that president bashar had mentioned -- commissioned three studies in february and march before the uprising broke out, and all three said, no, it's not going to happen in syria. so he felt pretty confident. i know for -- i can guarantee you that he was absolutely shocked when the uprising really started to seep into syria, particularly, of course, what lit the fire was the arrest and roughing up of the 15 school age children, teenagers, in the southern city of duras in syria. that touched a nerve. that sort of thing happened in syria quite a bit over the years, but in the new circumstances of the arab spring, and the regime didn't under the new circumstances -- it just grew and grew and grew after that. and it unleashed -- i think this
pulling location so there are technological advances and things that we can do. there's no federal money. we salute all little bit of it left in arizona that we will make probably available to the counties as may be matching a thing to address the renewal of our equipment but the resources are getting very thin. >> i appreciate that input and it strikes me as compelling. i have one last question. >> would you agree i at the leipheimer testimony the access is diminished by long waiting times and we should be concerned about this impact to read a recent study showed that in this election in 2012, 22% of african-americans, 24% of latinos had to wait more than 30 minutes but only 9 percent of the caucasian or white voters had to wait 30 minutes or longer. would you care to think that show with me what can be done to remedy and what does it say about the continued value of the voting rights act at the time the supreme court is reviewing its appropriateness? >> thank you. i don't have an explanation for why there are longer lines for some minority groups nationwide. i think the explanation may
as it sounds, is a lot less common than the past. they are using technology today in ways that are ever more insidious. >> what was your first book experience? you have a second book coming? >> yes, i do have a second book coming. >> congratulations. >> i'm very excited about that. it's a great thing. it's going to be domestic, it's going to involve introduction and a very significant event. in the life of the president, the guy on the 20-dollar bill. an event that everyone learns about in school, but there's a deeper section to it. i'm doing another deep dive just like i did on this one. >> what is the one thing that we all learned in school about andrew jackson? >> the trail of tears. the removal of indians from eastern united states. there's a lot more to that
to remote detonate explosives. they are using technology in ways that are ever more insidious. >> your first book? >> yes. >> what was your experience? to have a second look? >> i just signed a contract the other day. very excited about that. it's a great experience but what's the topic? >> it's going to be a little more domestic. it's going to involve andrew jackson as a really significant event. in the life of the president. the guy on the $20 bill. an event that everybody learns a sense about in school but there's a deeper deeper story to it. so in a way on to another deep dyed just like i did a deep dive on something that i knew a little bit about but realized i wanted to know a lot more. >> what is that one since we all learn in school speak with the trail of tears. about the removal of indians from the eastern united states. there's a lot more to that story. it speaks a lot of ways to the contentiousness of our politics today. >> if the voice you're hearing sounds familiar, that's because it is steve inskeep who is cohost of npr's "morning edition," and author of his first book, "insta
of traditional classroom and digital technology, employing them in a way that flips our traditional model of education. >> by the way, carn appeared on our afterwards program so if you want to watch that author, type in his name. long history between 12 and christopher hitchens. >> long history. we published christopher, "god is not great" in 2007. a number one "new york times" best seller. after that book we published his first memoir, followed last september by an essay collection called "arguably." also went on to be a best seller, but together under extreme circumstances. he was very ill at the time. we hoped to publish a book -- a long are -- longer book about his illness but we corrected the article for vanity fair. >> you're going to be at the miami book fair next week, november 17th, 18th, along with carol blue, and martin amos. >> that's going to be a really interesting panel to be on. martin and christopher knew each other for a very long time. carol and martin are very close mitchell relationship with christopher really dates back to "god is not great" and as my career blossome
made necessary by new technology. but congress has failed to do this. some court rulings have likewise fallen short of protecting the full scope -- the full spirit of the fourth amendment as it applies to our world of complex data sharing. courts have attempted in good faith to determine whether individuals have a reasonable expectation of privacy in different kinds of information that they might share to third parties, sometimes online. but the result of many of these rulings is a varied and unpredictable legal landscape in which many don't know and can't figure out whether they can rely on the fourth amendment to protect sensitive information that they routinely share with others for a limited business purpose. congress needs to act to preserve the fourth amendment's protections as they apply to everyday uses including routine use of the internet, use of credit cards, libraries and banks. absent such protections, individuals may in time grow weary of sharing information with third parties. i'm cognizant that this area of the law is complex. it's full of changes and full of instances
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11